NYC Restaurants

DoSirak
30 east 13th Street
New York, NY, 10003
(212) 366-9299

Cuisine: Korean , Comfort Food , Family Friendly

Menu Details: Goguma Mandu Gui, Haemul Pajeon, Dosirak Bibimbap, Bulgogi Ssam, Nakji Bokkeumbap  

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Cititour Review:
In a city where you can easily drop hundreds of dollars on a meal, it’s nice to know that in some places a ten spot still goes a long way.

DoSirak is one such place. This Korean restaurant offers simple home cooked meals. In fact, the word “dosirak” means “lunch box” in Korean. The menu is filled with dumplings, pancakes, soups and noodle dishes all costing about $10 or under. The highest price entrees go for $12.

The place itself is small with a nice slate floor and stuffed dolls lining the wall. The tables are kinda close and don’t try sitting in one of the molded plastic seats with deep sides if your rump is plump. I don’t consider myself overweight and I could barely squeeze in. Throughout the meal I feared my butt might be jammed in there. Luckily I was able to free myself despite some anxious moments. On my next visit I chose the wooden banquettes with a straw mat. Much better.

But I digress. Back to the meal.

The food is quite comforting and our server was sweet as could be. We began with crispy sweet potato and sweet pea dumplings ($5). They were quite delicious in their simplicity. As were the crispy chive pancakes with a soy-based dipping sauce ($7). One benefit of being near Union Square is that the restaurant is able to capitalize on the nearby farmer’s market, and it does, by offering daily specials with fresh vegetables, fish and free-range poultry.

On my first visit I tried the Bibim Naengmyeon, made with chilled buckwheat noodles topped with sliced pear, cucumber, radish and a hard-boiled egg. A hot pepper sauce adds fire to what could be a bland dish. You decide how much heat to apply by mixing in the sauce yourself. A little bit goes a long way.
So be careful!

On my second visit, I tried the Bulgogibap, which is a funny sounding name for a simple stir fry of sliced rib eye steak sautéed with onion, green peppers and carrots served on a bed of rice. I felt it could have used a bit more kick. But it definitely was comfort food.
Vegetarians will find comfort in the salads and soy-based items on the menu. There are also soups, including one called Yukgaejang, which is billed as being “so hot you’ll want to leave your coat behind.”

Just remember where I told you to stick your “behind.”
Review By: Sam Sayegh

Neighborhood: Greenwich Village

Entree Price: <$10


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